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Thread: What is it about pre 1964 Winchester Model 70's ?

  1. #1
    Banned

    What is it about pre 1964 Winchester Model 70's ?

    Why are the older *pre 1964* considered so good, or more valuable then the newer ones. I have 2 that are 197x and 198x and they are damned good rifles. I can't imagine old tech being better then new tech and I can't see the 1964 cut off as being more collectable for any apparent reason (at least not to me)

  2. #2
    Marksman

    Premium Member
    Golden-Eagle's Avatar
    I prefer my Belgian Auto Five to the modern version.
    Even a blind Squirrel finds a nut once in a while.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Quote Originally Posted by Golden-Eagle View Post
    I prefer my Belgian Auto Five to the modern version.
    That was a serious question though.... Why do people like the old ones better?

    If anyone knows, I'd like to be enlightened

  4. #4
    Marksman

    Premium Member

  5. #5
    Banned
    Quote Originally Posted by sgt z View Post
    loads of info - Thanks you for the link!

  6. #6
    Marksman
    I know someone posted this a while back, but it's a good one to consider -

    Another wrinkle for you to consider: the FN herstal patrol rifle was / is supposedly being produced using old Winchester model 70 actions. More reading http://www.snipercentral.com/pbr.htm
    Do I believe it? - not sure, would I consider this rifle with one of the longer barrels? - you bet (that's even with the qualification that the stock is not at all to my taste). Would I jump on a pre '64 wincester model 70 action (or, old, model 70 in 30 cal rifle) as a platform for a build - you betcha! But, that's just me, and I'm pretty nutz.

    Corollary: One should avoid those things that one knows are addictive. Stay away from old Winchester lever guns.. If an old Winchester finds its way to my house, it's kinda like a hound - it never leaves.

    Marc
    Rogers standing order #2:
    "Have your musket clean as a whistle, hatchet scoured, sixty rounds of powder and ball, and be ready to march at a moments notice."

    Graffito left by Canadian Fur Trader, Illinois Country, 1680:
    "Nous sommes touts Sauvages"

  7. #7
    Marksman
    I read an article a few years ago in which the author said the pre-64 "is as close to a hand built rifle as a factory built rifle can get".

  8. #8
    Banned
    Quote Originally Posted by rabiddawg View Post
    I read an article a few years ago in which the author said the pre-64 "is as close to a hand built rifle as a factory built rifle can get".
    I asked this very same question on another forum a while back. The condensed answer is that Winchester went to a stronger, safer, better functioning bolt that didn't do a controlled feed. So, just like when a company changes something today, the post 64 whiners went nuts that "the old ways" were messed with and proceeded to display a very public and long-lasting case of butthurt.

    It's all about butthurt. The bolts made after 64 were superior in every single way except it didn't do a controlled feed.
    Last edited by Nevarwinter; July 22nd, 2012 at 09:36 AM.

  9. #9
    Plinker deadduck's Avatar
    The original model 70 was based on a Mauser action, which offers "Controlled Round Feeding" where the claw extractor is in control of the round the whole time it is feeding until it is ejected. This is thought by many to be superior in function on a hunting rifle compared to newer 'pushfeed" actions. In 1964, Winchester changed the design to be more in line with the Remington type action, which was much cheaper and quicker to build. Many serious riflemen of the day did not like the move, creating a premium on the pre '64 rifles. Winchester eventually brought back the Mauser action as the Classic.

    I have a newer Stainless Classic .300 mag and it's a great rifle. Very solid. Does it feed any better than my Remington 700's. Not that I can tell. I do like it though.
    Last edited by deadduck; August 1st, 2012 at 06:09 PM.

  10. #10
    Marksman
    I think there's a "boy am I a dope" factor associated with any number of what have become "collectable" firearms. I am certain that part of my enthusiasm for rifles such as pre '64 model 70s is based on clear memories of passing up many fine examples because I am a dope!!

    I have a new manufacture Classic Model 70 Featherlite in .243. Is there a real difference? Probably negligible. My 243 shoots quite nicely and it appears that Winchester did tighten up overall quality on this rifle - it's a solid little rifle. Furthermore, aesthetically the rifle is pleasing - the wood quality is nice and the rifle is balanced well for a hunting rifle. The only aftermarket thing I had to do was to fiberglass bed the rifle and floated the barrel.

    The last kick in the pants goes something like: I want to use the very best action on my new (fill in the blank) rifle build. So, I'm going to shop for a pre '64 rifle - pay the premium for said rifle - just for the action to base my build on - and, in the process, destroy a hunting rifle that I know is better (and more valuable) quality than I am a hunter. (I recently stopped myself from doing just this - it was a real "what are you thinking moment")

    I know that my pre '64 Winchesters were made in a time when quality control and pride in manufacture and ownership of firearms was different than now. The grade of walnut, steel, and engineering were just better than they are now. I do think there are quality rifles and rifle components being manufactured right now, too. The plain, hard, truth is that the days of a working man ordering a quality rifle from the Sears catalog and taking it for granted the firearm will become a family heirloom to be passed on to beloved family members isn't coming back any time soon.
    Rogers standing order #2:
    "Have your musket clean as a whistle, hatchet scoured, sixty rounds of powder and ball, and be ready to march at a moments notice."

    Graffito left by Canadian Fur Trader, Illinois Country, 1680:
    "Nous sommes touts Sauvages"

  11. #11
    SEND IT Barney88PDC's Avatar
    If all you want to do is shoot deer sized targets inside the typical LA and MS range of 150 - 200 max a $100 Mosin will work. If you want precision you can have a custom barreled action with trigger for $1000 if you look around and are ahead of any factory gun if the smith plumbed it right and the barrel came for a reputable maker.

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