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Thread: Water heaters

  1. #11
    Marksman

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    Once you go tankless you won't go back. I haven't had one last less than 12 years. The first one I installed in my old house is still working and I think that thing has been in there for like 20 years. The one in the new house had the circuit board go out after about 12 years and just got a new one with local support. The guys that installed it come out once a year and fluch the system to remove any scale in it so I figure it is just routine maintenance. I love never running out of hot water as the wife and kids take full hot water showers.

  2. #12
    Marksman

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    Tankless are only good for gas hookups. If your house and current water heater are electric, tankless won't really work for you. But, if you're looking for a water heater manufacturer that is 100% made in the USA and good quality, you want a Bradford White. I can tell you with total knowledge and confidence that all Bradford White water heaters are completely manufactured in the USA (Michigan to be exact, so almost Canada! haha) with all American made components.
    Stephen WhoDat
    God Bless Our Troops!

  3. #13
    Pops

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    Right now I have a 50 gal electric Rheem water heater that is 22 years old. I'd say I got a good life out it. I added gas to the house a few months back with a possible swap over in mind so that's not a problem. Problem is I would have to replumb the water lines for a new location for the heater because of where the vent stack has to go. Back when I had gas run in the house the plumber gave me rough quote of $3000 for a tankless heater. Does that sound about right?

  4. #14
    Marksman

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    Was that quote for the plumber to install it and buy it? I think I bought mine from my local gas company and they installed it for ~$1800 total. Usually around ~$1000 will get you a tankless heater that will service 3 hot water outlets at one time so say 2 showers and the kitchen sink at once. But I would ask for an itemized quote maybe the plumber was quoting you for all the other work as well like the new plumbing lines and vent stack and running gas lines to it.

  5. #15
    ESSAYONS

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    Quote Originally Posted by shrxfn View Post
    Once you go tankless you won't go back. I haven't had one last less than 12 years. The first one I installed in my old house is still working and I think that thing has been in there for like 20 years. The one in the new house had the circuit board go out after about 12 years and just got a new one with local support. The guys that installed it come out once a year and fluch the system to remove any scale in it so I figure it is just routine maintenance. I love never running out of hot water as the wife and kids take full hot water showers.
    I had to replace a water heater where I used to live and looked into tankless about 3 years ago. I will be replacing my water heater where I live now and again looked at tankless to see if there were any major advances. From what I have read, a lot of the monthly savings will be spent on the yearly flush.

  6. #16
    Marksman

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    I saved a ton of money in my old house when I switched to tankless way more than if I had kept the tank version and I never flushed it out and it is still going strong after 20 years but it is also an indoor unit so that may have something to do with it.

    In the house we had built we went to a larger heater and it is an outdoor unit so it has to deal with a lot of weather as well as water quality. The original unit was a Takagi something or other and it lasted about 11 years and then the circuit board went out. We are on rural power so there are a lot of brownouts and flickers which could have contributed to the circuit board going out but until that happened it was going strong. The new unit is a Rinai I think and I am doing the flush out of an abundance of caution but think I could probably do it every other year and be fine.

    I think the biggest thing for me is never running out of hot water ever. I mean we can take 4 showers in a row and the water never gets cool. I mean you can't get that with a tank unless it was some huge tank.

  7. #17
    Marksman

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    Quote Originally Posted by mforsta View Post
    Well itís happened. My water heater, which of course was installed in my attic, started to leak. Iím looking for options and opinions on tankless water heaters. If anyone has one, let me hear some pros and cons.
    Thanks.
    This is why you should service your water heater. You should flush it every year or so and replace the anode rod. They make tanked water heaters with lifetime warranties(provided you flush them and change that rod).

  8. #18
    On Target

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    LMP #1593
    Master Plumber
    I had one in my last house. I have one in my current home.
    If the tankless water heater is installed as per manufacturer specs. The owner services the water heater on a regular bases. It should last a long time.
    The number one problem we run across with non functioning tankless water heaters is the gas line is undersized.
    The home owner had a tank type water heat before they install a tankless in its place. The B.T.U. rating on the old tank type is 40,000 B.T.U. the new tankless water heater is 199,000 B.T.U.
    The tankless water heater will show a error code for insufficient fuel.
    On Christmas and Thanksgiving, without fail, we will get a call from a customer. "I have a house full of guest and no hot water." The washing machine and dryer is running, the dishwasher is on, the central heater is going, the stove and oven are in use. A tankless water heater is usually at the end of the gas line. It will starve for natural gas at that capacity.

  9. #19
    Marksman

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    Jadacoop, in your experience are the majority of issues with water heaters related to not flushing/changing anode rod? That’s what it seems like to me, but I’m sure you have infinitely more experience.

  10. #20
    On Target

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    These are the most common problems my plumbers see
    1) Improper Installation (gas line undersized) (not vented properly)
    2) Not Flushing The System ( scale build up ) ( descaling is something most home owners can do )
    3) Computer Board ( electrical problems)

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