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Thread: J-frame group

  1. #1
    Newbie

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    J-frame group

    My primary carry is an Airweight 637-2 lightened up to 12.5oz with a titanium cylinder reamed for 9x19. Carry ammo is 147gr jhp. Recoil is brisk and about halfway between .38Sp+P and .357Mag. A little bit painful to the thumb, but not enough to cause flinching.

    I don't shoot it nearly often enough, so stopped and ran 5 rounds through it today (I only had 10 with me). 30 feet, one handed, windy conditions. I didn't do too well. Horizontal scatter was four rounds at 3/4 inch with one thrown 1.5 inches to right.
    Vertical scatter was three rounds at 1.5 inches with two thrown 3.5 inches high.

    I'm fairly content with the horizontal scatter, but those two rounds that were thrown 3.5 inches high bug me. Two of these shots would have missed a coke can at 30 feet. What do you guys think I may have been doing to cause those vertical throws?

    BTW, my backup is a Kimber Micro 9 also with the 147gr jhp.

  2. #2
    tactical hangover

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimCunn View Post
    My primary carry is an Airweight 637-2 lightened up to 12.5oz with a titanium cylinder reamed for 9x19. Carry ammo is 147gr jhp. Recoil is brisk and about halfway between .38Sp+P and .357Mag. A little bit painful to the thumb, but not enough to cause flinching.

    I don't shoot it nearly often enough, so stopped and ran 5 rounds through it today (I only had 10 with me). 30 feet, one handed, windy conditions. I didn't do too well. Horizontal scatter was four rounds at 3/4 inch with one thrown 1.5 inches to right.
    Vertical scatter was three rounds at 1.5 inches with two thrown 3.5 inches high.

    I'm fairly content with the horizontal scatter, but those two rounds that were thrown 3.5 inches high bug me. Two of these shots would have missed a coke can at 30 feet. What do you guys think I may have been doing to cause those vertical throws?

    BTW, my backup is a Kimber Micro 9 also with the 147gr jhp.

    Due to the recoil, I suffer the same.. Mine is almost all anticipating the massive recoil and report.. I run a 340pd with 158g 357 mags

  3. #3
    La. CHP Instructor #409

    Premium Member

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    Center Mass is larger than 3".

  4. #4
    Newbie

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    Thanks. I'll work on that.

  5. #5
    Newbie

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    "Center Mass is larger than 3".

    Not on a squirrel head or snake neck :-)

  6. #6
    La. CHP Instructor #409

    Premium Member

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    Quote Originally Posted by JimCunn View Post
    "Center Mass is larger than 3".

    Not on a squirrel head or snake neck :-)
    A MK4 Ruger .22 is a good squirrel or snake pistol.
    I took out 2 Possums with one recently at 75'.

  7. #7
    Newbie

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    I used to use a Ruger single six .22 for that

  8. #8
    Marksman

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    Buy a 22 revolver and practice, practice, practice - then dry practice with yours - when firing focus on the front sight and stroke the trigger deliberately - think the words as you focus "Front Sight, stroke" as you let the gun go off when that sequence plays out - and the bullets will magically matriculate to the X. Over time. With work.

  9. #9
    Not Banned!!!

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    Less coffee and more dry fire!!

    I would suggest that you should do some hand and wrist strengthening exercises but I am sure there will be some expert along to correct me on that. Whatever.

    You could also buy a nagant revolver and use it for dry fire practice. It has something like a 72lb da pull. If you get good with it that airweight should be a piece of cake
    "These Rocky Mountains aren't very rocky. Yeah, that John Denver is full of SH**!"

  10. #10
    Marksman

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    I agree with the dry fire suggestion. If you really want to hit center mass dead center consistently, then you can not afford to anticipate recoil. Dry fire practice is great training, because you are doing everything that happens on the range without the round firing and the resulting recoil. You will stop anticipating recoil if the majority of your trigger time is dry fire. USPSA competition shooters will sometimes spend an entire hour on dry fire.

    The only costs involved is the price of the snap caps and your time. The suggestion about doing the dry fire drills with a bad double-action trigger is a good one. Most of my dry fire is done with my HK P30, but a Nagant revolver is cheaper. Your cheapest option though is the purchase of 9mm snap caps for your revolver. I do 50-100 snaps per session rotating between isosceles, right, and left.
    Last edited by 323MAR; September 3rd, 2020 at 03:07 AM.

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