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  1. #11
    Sportsman 'N' Paradise

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    Quote Originally Posted by John_ View Post
    Dave is right on, you could not pick a worse time to buy or build an AR. Supply and demand, just like ammo right now. Stripped lowers are going for anywhere from $75 to 125 right now, crazy prices.

    That DPMS AR15 selling for $500 new a couple years ago is commanding $700+ in the used market right now in very good condition. You just cannot walk into a store and purchase 5.56 ammo right now. Isn't happening. Ditto 9mm Luger.

    And if you are going to only build one or two, not really worth the expense for a few specialized tools you need to properly assemble an AR15, especially the upper assembly.
    Any tools you buy to contruct a AR will end up being useful later on. Armor's wrench, punch set etc. You will eventually want to change something, buffer tube, trigger group etc. Nothing like building a AK where you need a whole shop full of new tools and jigs.
    Last edited by MikeSlater; September 16th, 2020 at 02:41 PM.

  2. #12
    Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeSlater View Post
    Any tools you buy to contruct a AR will end up being useful later on. Armor's wrench, punch set etc. You will eventually want to change something, buffer tube, trigger group etc. Nothing like building a AK where you need a whole shop full of new tools and jigs.
    Well if you are going to do it right, you will need a bench vice, an upper receiver block, a quality barrel nut wrench/tool, torque wrench, small punches, starter punches for small roll pins, lubricant for the barrel nut/upper receiver threads, feeler gauges, go and no go head space gauges, and a proper hammer. I like many here have all of these tools, invested in them. If you plan on only assembling one or even two rifles, you would be a fool to purchase all of these. I probably have $500 tot in specialized tools, maybe more.

    Easier to find someone on the forum who has all the tools, has the expertise, is close to you and willing to do it or help you, for just a single rifle. Beer swap, or lunch, or maybe a small donation.

    Or purchase an assembled complete upper and a complete lower receiver unit and "pin together". Done. PSA still has that option avail, limited selections on the uppers right now tho. Many complete assembled lower receiver units "on the shelf" right now.
    Last edited by John_; September 17th, 2020 at 03:21 AM.
    "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." -- George Santayana

  3. #13
    Sportsman 'N' Paradise

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    I was mainly referring to just finishing out a stripped lower and slapping a built upper on it. I would say that building a upper from scratch would beyond what someone with no gunsmith experience would tackle anyway. If you have that kind of experience you already have the tools.

  4. #14
    Shooter

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    There was a guy here a number of years ago who used his $15 armorers wrench and a piece of 1x3" wood to install/tighten the barrel nut to upper receiver. No torque wrench, no receiver block, and a cheap imported armorers wrench....and insisted nobody needed more otherwise. I just had to laugh to myself. Check head space? Why? Check it with a mag and 20 rounds.

    Today many of the free float handguards have their own proprietary barrel nut. I'm a fan of the ALGs, they have their nut, shims, and specialized AL install tool (for $4). Noveske has theirs too, a thin 1 and 1/16" tool. Not many of the FF tubes today use a traditional GI barrel nut any longer.
    Last edited by John_; September 17th, 2020 at 07:32 AM.
    "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." -- George Santayana

  5. #15
    _________

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    If I put together a list of all the tools, lubricants, greases, adhesives, and threadlockers I use to assemble a rifle, it’s well over $500. People are hesitant to spend $1000 on a rifle when $500 rifles exist. Nothing is worse than spending $1500 to assemble a rifle that would cost $500 from a shop.

    Don’t build unless you really want to and are okay with the investment.

  6. #16
    Marksman

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    If you have an auto mechanic friend he can help you build an AR . Some people like to make it sound like an art but it's really simple mechanics . As far as which caliber goes the intended purpose will dictate that .. 223 w or 5.56 are usually realitivly inexpensive to feed and will surfice in a SD situation and with the right bullets can be effective on deer at close to moderate ranges . If you reload or are not into mag dumping and intend to hunt with it go 6.8 spc . Ruger and S&W both make good guns .

    Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

  7. #17
    _________

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozarkpugs View Post
    If you have an auto mechanic friend he can help you build an AR . Some people like to make it sound like an art but it's really simple mechanics . As far as which caliber goes the intended purpose will dictate that .. 223 w or 5.56 are usually realitivly inexpensive to feed and will surfice in a SD situation and with the right bullets can be effective on deer at close to moderate ranges . If you reload or are not into mag dumping and intend to hunt with it go 6.8 spc . Ruger and S&W both make good guns .

    Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
    Automotive Mechanics don't know a thing about assembling AR-15's unless they have experience and knowledge of assembling AR-15's.

    It is simple, when you do things the right way. Having your auto mechanic friend cobble a rifle together... is not the right way.

  8. #18
    Marksman

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  9. #19
    Marksman

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    Quote Originally Posted by DAVE_M View Post
    Automotive Mechanics don't know a thing about assembling AR-15's unless they have experience and knowledge of assembling AR-15's.

    It is simple, when you do things the right way. Having your auto mechanic friend cobble a rifle together... is not the right way.
    I guess I should have said a mechanic that is a shooter , is knowledgeable of how firearms work and can follow directions . Seriously , nothing about building an AR is difficult . A 5th grader can lap an upper and the dreaded pivot pin launch can be avoided by inserting a multi hole 1/4 pivot pin in as a alignment tool . Putting hung pins on a door is more complicated . Most rails come with nuts with flats and don't have to be aligned and the torque range is from good-n-snug to good-n-tight . I have used a torque wrench to prove to several people I have helped on builds that most everyone can get close to the middle of the range with an open end wrench. Most mechanics have a vise ,brass hammer and all the punches you need . Mechanics understand proper alignment of tubes and the nessesity of sealing and probably has blue loctie and good synthetic oil on hand . If you get an under gassed barrel he can even open it up for you . That is the beauty of the AR platform even though it was not built by a tank mechanic It is simple mechanics . I for one would never be trust my vehicle to someone who could not build an AR .




    Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk

  10. #20
    Shooter

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    Quote Originally Posted by ozarkpugs View Post
    If you have an auto mechanic friend he can help you build an AR . Some people like to make it sound like an art but it's really simple mechanics . As far as which caliber goes the intended purpose will dictate that .. 223 w or 5.56 are usually realitivly inexpensive to feed and will surfice in a SD situation and with the right bullets can be effective on deer at close to moderate ranges . If you reload or are not into mag dumping and intend to hunt with it go 6.8 spc . Ruger and S&W both make good guns .

    Sent from my moto g(7) play using Tapatalk
    Yeah, that is how Colt and FN America assemble their rifles. They manufacture their precision parts and then haul em down to the local auto mechanic shop for assembly.

    Now I grant you it isn't rocket science and the lower assembly is a piece of cake, but wait til you scratch the lower using a regular automotive punch to start/drive in the bolt stop lever small roll pin.
    "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." -- George Santayana

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