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  1. #1
    Hobbyist

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    could use advice from offshore guys

    I just recently got hired on with a offshore supply boat company and got out of the automotive repair industry. I'm going in as a deckhand obviously, and the company I'm with is talking about getting me in the engine room to work with and learn to become a engineer. I'm good with it, due to it being a major career change I've been looking forward to. I'll be working 28/14 schedule. Does anyone on here work in the oil/gas industry offshore on boats/rigs, etc.. that would be willing to offer a green guy any advice whatsoever? I'm literally going into this blind. I don't know anyone personally that works in the industry so i thought I'd ask here.
    If you are so proud of where you're from that you fly your flag everywhere, please go back there. Your flag offends me! American lives Matter!

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  2. #2
    Marksman

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    Bring plenty of everything. Bring Dramamine for sure, for motion sickness, along with any other meds you could possibly need. Iíll think of other things and post up for you.

  3. #3
    Marksman

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    Learn to deal with being away for a long time and learn to space out your bills and cash flow.

    I worked on drilling rigs and used to take boats and sometimes waves get bad. So yeah get medicine. Anything you use or think you will use get double. A lot of times 28 days could be an extra week or two or someone came up last min and didn't have everything.

    Always repack you bag when you get home so it is ready when you are ready for work also.

    And the final but most important thing. Save money. Oilfield goes up and down a lot. I am on my second and last layoff now and not going back.

  4. #4
    Wealthy women wanted

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    Even if your prone to motion sickness you’ll get used to it.
    Learn as much as you can, document hours, training etc so one day you can go to work on a bigger vessel with a better schedule and living conditions.
    Don’t be lazy, always volunteer for the hard stuff. If you get *asked* to work over they aren’t really asking. Do it.
    Offshore work is different than a normal job in that you need to make your hitch unless there is a serious emergency with immediate family. You are going to miss funerals, weddings, holidays etc so just except that fact and if someone gets pissed about it oh well.

  5. #5
    BSGA

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    I've been doing this long enough, that I'm kinda scared to share, but been working offshore in the industry since the late 70's. all of the above is good advice, but I'll add a few more:
    1. Try to learn as much as you can. Any training offered, take it, you'll use it even if you don't stay at your new job.
    2. There will be someone, somewhere, that claims to know everything there is to know about the industry. When you run across that guy, RUN! He's the one that will get you killed. NOBODY knows everything about this industry, and never will.
    3. Don't always take the first explanation for how or why something works the way it does. Observe for yourself, and if what you're told doesn't feel right, search or research the correct way. In your chosen path, the U.S.C.G. and A.B.S. is the bomb when it comes to the marine side of things. Those guys are awesome!

  6. #6
    *Banned*

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    If you like to read, bring plenty of books or magzines with you.
    I love the smell of napalm in the morning. It smells like, victory!
    Rommel, you magnificent bastard, I read your book!
    Still got the shovel!

  7. #7
    Hobbyist

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    Note taken from all you guys. Thanks....flyboy: I'm not a big reader, but my wife is a huge book(ie).. my living room is basically a library for her. I may bring one or 2 of her books. Lol
    If you are so proud of where you're from that you fly your flag everywhere, please go back there. Your flag offends me! American lives Matter!

    Support LEO........
    Provide Backup!

  8. #8
    Wealthy women wanted

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    One more thing. Allot of guys out there end up divorced. While some marriages are destined for failure I noticed a common thing out there.

    You can’t spend X amount of days offshore then go home and think you’ll stay in the woods or bar or fishing everyday home. No woman will stand for that very long.

  9. #9
    Liberty Gun Works

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    So Far, all of this is great advise. I have worked in the gas and oil industry for about 16 years and yes it is at best, a temporary employment unless you are on with a major company and vested with that company. I think the best advise would be to save, save, save as much as you can put aside. Next would be as I see your Navy avatar, which you well know means "never again volunteer yourself", Always volunteer for everything they offer as in training and different positions on the boat. Learn what you can. It will all pay off in the end if you fall into the layoff crowd. There will be other companies as they all come and go in the oilfield. I too was Navy and still must take Dramamine to keep from hanging over the side. The third most important thing would be to never take your wife for granted. Spend your days off with the family. Good Luck and Smooth Sailing

  10. #10
    Marksman

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    I like to play games, and it was always funny on how every crew/supply boat have an xbox/ps. When the switch came out, I started bringing that. I have friends that bring their gaming systems, and other bring a gaming laptop. A few boats have satellite internet that works pretty well, so if you like surfing the net on your time off, you can always do that.

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